Category Archives: Suicide Assessment and Intervention

A Free Psychotherapy.net Video Offering

I’m just writing you all on this beautiful fall afternoon in Montana to let you know about a FREE 20ish minute video titled, “Working Online with Suicidal Clients in the Age of COVID.” The video features Victor Yalom of Psychotherapy.net and me discussing issues related to suicide and distance counseling.

In honor of national Suicide Prevention Awareness Month, Psychotherapy.net is offering this video free (n.b., to access the video, you’ll need to enter your email address). Note: I used “n.b.” in my previous parenthetical comment to stick with the “Yalom” theme, because I learned to use n.b. (along with a plethora of new vocabulary words, like solipsistic, amnestic, servility, internecine, and sacrosanct), from reading Irvin Yalom’s group psychotherapy textbook.

Here’s the link: https://academy.psychotherapy.net/suicide-prevention-2021-jsf-signup

Victor and I also collaborated on a longer (7.5 hour) suicide assessment and treatment psychotherapy.net video that may be available through your university library subscription.

I hope you’re all as healthy and well as possible.

Happy Autumn,

JSF

The ACA Town Hall is Tomorrow

Rita and I get to be the guests for tomorrow’s online ACA Town Hall. The topic for the day is suicide, but more generally, the Town Hall, moderated by ACA President Dr. Kent Becker, is designed to be a community event for ACA members. The suicide discussion will be brief and there will be several other break-out groups in the Zoom format.

To participate, you’ll need to be a member of the American Counseling Association (ACA). As ACA members, you can attend for free, but you need to register in advance. Here’s the link: https://imis.counseling.org/store/events/registration.aspx?event=DOH2021SEP

My apologies for the late notice on this.

I hope everyone is well and thriving as much as possible.

John

Early Birds and Two Upcoming Strengths-Based Suicide Trainings

On September 24, I’m doing a full-day online-only Strengths-Based Suicide Assessment and Treatment Planning workshop. The workshop is on behalf of the Association for Humanistic Counselors . . . a cool professional organization if there ever was one.

I’m posting today because today is the last day for the “Early bird rates” for this AHC workshop. Just in case you want to be an early bird, this link will give you that chance . . . at least for a few more hours: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07eibjc7x5afb40bd4&oseq=&c=&ch=&fbclid=IwAR2mwGRA6UgOtrTXBdWlS8ZlQAArlPlQR3LGOZigxdIeyodKcIBtY1yovXs

Just in case you want two-days of Strengths-Based Suicide Training or you want to come to the U of Montana or you need some college credit, we’ve got a full two-day version of the workshop happening in Missoula on November 19 and 20. In addition, if you’re wanting a continuing education smörgåsbord, this link also includes two day trainings with the fabulous Dr. Kirsten Murray (Strong Couples) and the amazing Dr. Bryan Cochran (LGBTQI+ Clients). Here’s that link: https://www.familiesfirstmt.org/umworkshops.html

There’s more happening too . . . but for now, this is probably enough for one post.

Have a fantastic week, and don’t be afraid to be the early bird.

Coping with Suicide Deaths

A recent smoky sunrise on the Stillwater River

As most of you know, I recently published an article in Psychotherapy Networker on my long-term experience of coping with the death of a client by suicide. In response to the article, I’ve gotten many supportive responses, some of which included additional published resources on coping with client death by suicide.

This blog post has two parts. First, I’m promoting the Networker article again to get it more widely shared as one resource for counselors and psychotherapists who have lost a client. Below, is an excerpt from the article. . . followed by a link. Please share with friends and colleagues as you see fit.

Second, at the end of this post I’m including additional resource articles that several people have shared with me over the past two weeks.

Here’s the excerpt . . .

The Prevention Myth

I’d worked with Ethan for about 20 sessions. Stocky, socially awkward, and intellectually gifted, he often avoided telling me much of anything, but his unhappiness was palpable. He didn’t fit in with classmates or connect with teachers. Ethan felt like a misfit at home and out of place at school. Nearly always, he experienced the grinding pain of being different, regardless of the context.

But aren’t we all different? Don’t we all suffer grinding pain, at least sometimes? What pushed Ethan to suicide when so many others, with equally difficult life situations and psychodynamics, stay alive?

One truth that reassures me now, and I wish I’d grasped back in the 1990s, is that empirical research generally affirms that suicide is unpredictable. This reality runs counter to much of what we hear from well-meaning suicide-prevention professionals. You may have heard the conventional wisdom: “Suicide is 100 percent preventable!” and, “If you educate yourself about risk factors and warning signs, and ask people directly about suicidal thoughts or plans, you can save lives.”

Although there’s some empirical evidence for these statements (i.e., sometimes suicide is preventable, and sometimes you can save lives), the general idea that knowledge of suicide risk, protective factors, and warning signs will equip clinicians to predict individual suicides is an illusion. In a 2017 large-scale meta-analysis covering 50 years of research on risk and protective factors, Joseph Franklin of Vanderbilt University and nine other prominent suicide researchers conducted an exhaustive analysis of 3,428 empirical studies. They found very little support for risk or protective factors as suicide predictors. In one of many of their sobering conclusions, they wrote, “It may be tempting to interpret some of the small differences across outcomes as having meaningful implications, . . . however, we note here that all risk factors were weak in magnitude and that any differences across outcomes . . . are not likely to be meaningful.”

Franklin and his collaborators were articulating the unpleasant conclusion that we have no good science-based tools for accurately predicting suicide. I hope this changes, but at the moment, I find comfort in the scientific validation of my personal experience. For years, I’ve held onto another suicide quotation for solace. In 1995, renowned suicidologist Robert Litman wrote, “When I am asked why one depressed and suicidal patient dies by suicide while nine other equally depressed and equally suicidal patients do not, I answer, ‘I don’t know.’”

Here’s the link to the full article: https://www.psychotherapynetworker.org/magazine/article/2565/the-myth-of-infallibility

Here are the additional resources people have shared with me:

Ellis, T. E., & Patel, A. B. (2012). Client suicide: what now?. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice19(2), 277-287.

Jorgensen, M. F., Bender, S., & McCutchen, A. (2021) “I’m haunted by it:” Experiences of licensed counselors who had a client die by suicide. Journal of Counselor Leadership and Advocacy. DOI: 10.1080/2326716X.2021.1916790

Knox, S., Burkard, A. W., Jackson, J. A., Schaack, A. M., & Hess, S. A. (2006). Therapists-in-training who experience a client suicide: Implications for supervision. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 37(5), 547-557.

Ting, L., Jacobson, J. M., & Sanders, S. (2008). Available supports and coping behaviors of mental health social workers following fatal and nonfatal client suicidal behavior. Social work, 53(3), 211-221.

As always, thanks for reading, and have a great day!

Montana Conference on Suicide Prevention — My Powerpoints

Good morning. I’m listening to Dr. David Jobes talk about innovations in approaching suicide assessment and treatment. I’m struck by the breadth and depth of his knowledge . . . and also discouraged by him acknowledging how difficult it is to change people’s mindsets regarding suicidality and its treatment. At this point we ALREADY have many effective psychosocial treatments, but disappointingly, the media and public knowledge still leans toward profiling hospitalization and the potential of medication (both of which show very mixed results).

I’ll stop with my rant here and post my ppts. Thanks for reading . . . and be sure to get the word out on innovations in suicide assessment and treatment (aka psychosocial treatments).

Tomorrow – Another Suicide Prevention Conference with Free CEUs

The second of two consecutive suicide prevention conferences with free CEUs is tomorrow! Just in case you didn’t know, this conference, the Montana Conference on Suicide Prevention, has two full hours of David Jobes–the creator of CAMS–in the afternoon. How often do you get to listen to Dr. Jobes for two hours, for free, and get CEUs? Not often, I suspect.

Here’s the conference link. Go to the bottom to find the registration button: https://www.montanacosp.org/

In related news, I just got an email from the Association for Humanistic Counseling about an upcoming all-day conference on Strengths-Based Suicide Assessment and Treatment (with me presenting!). The date is: 9.24.21. This one has a small fee for CEUs . . . but it’s cheaper if you become an AHC member. Here’s the registration link for that one: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07eibjc7x5afb40bd4&oseq=&c=&ch=

Have a great evening and I hope to “see” you tomorrow at the Montana conference.

Mental Health Academy Suicide Summit PowerPoint Slides

Good morning! The 2021 MHA Suicide Summit has started (see below) and I’ll be up in less than an hour.

Sometimes I think the hardest part about doing workshops is writing the workshop blurb. My problem-and maybe it’s just my problem—is that the process of writing workshop blurbs nearly always impairs my judgment. I start out writing like a sensible and rational person, but eventually I decompensate into displaying delusions of grandeur. For the Mental Health Academy Suicide Summit, I completely lost touch with reality and claimed that I would,

  1. Describe strengths-based principles for suicide assessment and treatment
  2. Be able to implement three strengths-based assessment tools (and recognize the limits of risk and protective factor assessment)
  3. Identify suicide drivers (and goals) linked to seven common life dimensions
  4. Describe at least one wellness and mood management positive psychology strategy for patients and practitioners.

Of course, all of this is great, but, here’s the catch. I’m only presenting for 45 minutes!

If anyone out there can help me become more realistic, I would appreciate the input.

In the meantime, here are the ppts for the presentation today.

John

This Month’s Psychotherapy Networker Magazine and the Myth of Infallibility

Hi All,

In this post I’m sharing a link to an article I just had published in Psychotherapy Networker. Although I had hoped it would be the Networker’s “lead article,” instead, they put Shankar Vedantam first? And then a bunch of other people, like David Burns and Martha Manning? Seriously? All jokes aside, the truth is, I’m humbled to be included.

The article—titled “The Myth of Infallibility”—is about my immediate and ongoing emotional reactions to the loss of a client to suicide. I hope the article provides useful information and emotional support for counselors and psychotherapists who have experienced—or will experience—a similar loss.

You can use the following link to bypass the paywall and read the article for free.

https://www.psychotherapynetworker.org/magazine/article/2565/the-myth-of-infallibility/f576ab48-e662-46f0-b122-06ab19d35e28/OIM

Thanks for reading this. Please share the link if you feel so moved. One of my counseling colleagues shared it with all her students, which seemed great to me, mostly because IMHO, we don’t talk much or get formal training on how to cope when or if we have a client who dies by suicide.

Today, I’m especially grateful for all the people in my life who have supported me in one way or another, over so many years.

Thank you and have a great week.

John S-F

Upcoming Suicide Prevention Events with FREE CEUs

For those of you interested in gathering FREE professional continuing education hours AND because I’m terrible at updating my blog upcoming events calendar, here’s a quick preview of two talks I’m giving later this month.

On Saturday, July 24, I’ll be doing an hour-long live, online presentation and Q & A for the Mental Health Academy’s 2021 Suicide Prevention Summit. The cool thing (among many cool things) about this summit is that it’s completely free. . . and you can get up to 10 CEUs. You can tune in live, or register and then watch recorded versions of the presentations (that’s what I did last year and getting my 10 CEUs was smooth as butter). You can learn more about the event and how to register here:  https://www.mentalhealthacademy.net/suicideprevention/aas

On Friday, July 30, I’m providing a short (30 minute) presentation on the Montana Happiness Project and strengths-based approaches, and then participating on a panel for the 9th Annual Montana Conference on Suicide Prevention. As with the Mental Health Academy Summit, this event is free, although you must register in advance. For information on speakers, registration, and the conference schedule, click on this link: https://www.montanacosp.org/

Let me know if you have questions and I hope you’re staying as safe and as cool as you can . . .

Seven Dimensions of Suicide Assessment and Treatment

Here’s a glimpse of what the garden looks like this morning.

In most of life, most of the time, there’s not much completely new or original. People tend to gather inspiration from others and build on or rediscover old ideas. This my way of acknowledging that, although I wish I always had a boatload of original ideas to share in the blog, more often than not, I’m embracing the green new deal and . . . re-using, recycling, and repurposing old ideas.

The following Table describes the seven dimension model that Rita and I use to aid clinicians in conducting assessments and interventions with clients or patients who are suicidal. These seven dimensions aren’t original, but the idea that suicide drivers (and risk/protective factors) can emerge and influence people from any or all of these dimensions is helpful in a more or less original way. Check out the Table to see if it’s useful for you.

Dimension: In this column, we define the dimensionsEvidence-Based Suicide Drivers: In this column, we identify risk factors or suicide drivers that can push or pull individuals toward suicidality. The key to this model is to identify and treat the main sources of distress (aka psychache). In the next columns (not included here), you would find wellness goals and specific interventions.
Emotional: all human emotions.Excruciating emotional distress

Specific disturbing emotions (guilt, shame, anger, sadness)

Emotional dysregulation
Cognitive: All forms of human thought, including imagery.Hopelessness

Problem-solving impairments

Maladaptive thoughts

Negative core beliefs
Interpersonal: All human relationships.Social disconnection and perceived burdensomeness

Interpersonal loss and grief

Social skill deficits

Repeating dysfunctional relationship patterns
Physical: All human biogenetics and physiology.Biogenetic predispositions and physical illness

Sedentary lifestyle; poor nutrition

Agitation, arousal, anxiety

Trauma, nightmares, insomnia
Spiritual-Cultural: All religious, spiritual, cultural values that provide meaning and purpose.Religious or spiritual disconnection

Cultural disconnection or dislocation

Meaninglessness
Behavioral: All human action and activity.Using substances or self-harm for desensitization

Suicide planning, intent, and preparation

Impulsivity
Contextual: All factors outside of the individual that influence human behavior.No connection to place or nature

Chronic exposure to unhealthy environmental conditions

Socioeconomic oppression or resource scarcity (e.g., poverty)

If you’re interested in learning more, our suicide book is available through the American Counseling Association https://imis.counseling.org/store/detail.aspx?id=78174 or through the usual booksellers.

Have a great weekend.

JSF