Happiness is Coming . . .


From M 2019 Spring

There’s hardly any place more beautiful than Missoula in the spring. . . which, despite the looming winter, will come to the University of Montana in January (we call Jan-May “Spring” semester). In the past, UM has been rated as the most “Gorgeous” campus in the U.S. Just saying.

Although I love UM, UM also sometimes gives me frustration. That’s natural. Last month, I submitted an op-ed piece to the campus newspaper, “The Kaimin.” I never heard back. Hmm. Oh well. I’m not TOO frustrated, because I know an alternative and exciting venue where I can get it published for sure. . . right here!

Just so I reach my audience, please share this with all the Kaimin readers you know, or other college/university students.

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For many students, college life is a blissful state of intellectual growth, social relationships, and recreation. My memories as a graduate student at the University of Montana are some of the best of my life. But, to be honest, I also recall going to the campus health center (way before it was called Curry Health) with heart palpitations; I also went to individual counseling and participated in a therapeutic group. Life was good, but it wasn’t all roses and chocolate.

The truth is, the college years are times of great stress and strain for most students. Earlier this year, based on data from over 67,000 undergraduates, researchers reported: “College students face unprecedented levels of distress that affect their mental health” (Liu, Stevens, Wong, Yasui, & Chen, 2019). They detailed the stresses, noting that depression, anxiety, suicide, and other mental health problems are on the rise among college students. These data happened to coincide with an area of professional interest for me: I’ve often wondered, what makes people less depressed and less anxious? Or, put in more positive terms, what creates happiness or fulfillment? What factors contribute to a sense of well-being? What makes for a well-lived life?

As many of you already know, my explorations in this area have led to Rita and I developing a course I’ll be teaching this spring titled, “The Art and Science of Happiness.” In this course, we’ll explore the scientific research on happiness and psychological well-being. We’ll debunk some happiness myths. The class will also include an applied “Happiness Lab,” and all the students will be assigned personal happiness consultants. How cool is that?

In the happiness lab, students will meet in small study groups (about 10 students) to experiment with research-based techniques designed to promote emotional well-being. Examples include mindfulness (we’ve got a great egg-balancing activity all ready), savoring (did you know there are specific techniques people can use to extend and elaborate on their positive experiences?), and methods for cultivating gratitude (we’ll explore how to do this live and in-person, and through social media).

Courses on this happiness and well-being have sprung up across the country and across disciplines. From Harvard and Yale to small community colleges, the classes have not only proven popular, but are also shown to have positive effects on self-reported happiness and well-being. I’m looking forward to offering this class at UM, hopefully adding our own Griz flavor to the existing materials.

The Art and Science of Happiness will meet on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 11am to 12:20pm. You can register for it on Cyberbear (Google Cyberbear). If you have questions you want answered before you to take the plunge into a happier life, email me at john.sf@mso.umt.edu.

2 thoughts on “Happiness is Coming . . .”

  1. This sounds so good. And worth the time and academic credit. I wish I could take it. My guess is that this may launch a seriously healthy happiness movement.

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