Favorite Quotations: Clinical Interviewing – Chapter One


These are my favorite quotations from Chapter One. Unfortunately, I didn’t find one of my own:)

It is good to have an end to journey toward;

but it is the journey that matters, in the end.

—Ursula K. Le Guin, The Left Hand of Darkness

 

In his 1939 book The Wisdom of the Body, Walter Cannon {{3281 Cannon 1939;}} wrote:

When we consider the extreme instability of our bodily structure, its readiness for disturbance by the slightest application of external forces . . . its persistence through so many decades seems almost miraculous. The wonder increases when we realize that the system is open, engaging in free exchange with the outer world, and that the structure itself is not permanent, but is being continuously broken down by the wear and tear of action, and as continuously built up again by processes of repair. (p. 20)

 

Strupp and Binder {{324 Strupp 1984;}} gave to mental health professionals three decades ago: “ . . . the therapist should resist the compulsion to do something, especially at those times when he or she feels under pressure from the patient (and himself or herself) to intervene, perform, reassure, and so on” (p. 41).

 

About two decades ago, Phares (1988) concluded that the need for diagnosis before intervention is standard practice in psychology:

Intuitively, we all understand the purpose of diagnosis or assessment. Before physicians can prescribe, they must first understand the nature of the illness. Before plumbers begin banging on pipes, they must first determine the character and location of the difficulty. What is true in medicine and plumbing is equally true in clinical psychology. Aside from a few cases involving blind luck, our capacity to solve clinical problems is directly related to our skill in defining them. (p. 142)

 

As Strupp and Binder (1984) noted, “Recall an old Maine proverb: ‘One can seldom listen his [or her] way into trouble’ ” (p. 44).

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